It is 7:30 am and my head is spinning.

I’ve already fielded at least 50 questions from my daughter in reference to the breakfast options in the house and why she can’t consume popsicles or ice cream for breakfast (despite the fact we literally just talked about this yesterday).

Although I’ve taken the time to put out some brand new crayons and a coloring book last night, my daughter pays no mind to this and begins to methodically remove random items from the pantry in effort to “make a concoction, mom!” Out of the corner of my eye I see pantry condiments being strewn across the room.

I’m a fairly straightforward, logical person. Although I may have a trifling streak of creativity, for the most part I am a left-brained, logical thinking kind of gal (which is probably what earned me the nickname of “the mom” in college). In this light, it’s easy to understand why my right-brained, free-spirited child has given me a run for my money. In just about any area I can think of, my independent and strong-willed kid has handed me my common-sensed reasonable ego, minced up on a silver platter. 

Either these kids see and experience the world in a different way due to being right brain dominant (where our emotions are housed), or they are, in fact, evil minions that set out from day one to disapprove the “parenting expert” who happened to bring them into the world. Although many days the mom in me would try to convince you it’s the whole evil minion thing, the child therapist in me knows that it’s actually the former concept that’s accurate.

These kids are creative minds.

Ever notice that one of your kids seems to leave a messy trail behind them wherever they go?

Kids that are right-brain dominant are usually very creative, which can lead to messes of epic proportions. The parents of these kids know what I’m talking about. These kids don’t commonly play with toys in in conventional ways, because well, that’d be too straightforward.

Instead they’ll produce intricate and awesome creations and scenarios, leaving behind the most absurd piles of random assorted objects you’ve ever seen in your life (the kind of pile you have to leave until tomorrow morning because the thought of sorting it all out makes your brain hurt).

These kids are independent spirits.

Can’t get one word out of your mouth that goes unchallenged?

You say the sky is blue, and they point out, “during the sunset it’s orange, pink, and yellow!” If you can relate to this you may have an right-brained soul in your home. You’re such a centered and educated parent, why can’t these children sit quietly as you methodically impart knowledge to them via reasonable discussion? The nerve! 

Despite all of your wise teachings, your spirited kid is most likely not going to simply take your word for it. He’s going to go out and explore the world to figure it out for himself, through his natural modalities of learning, exploration and observation.

These kids are sensitive and emotional souls.

Ever feel like you’re standing in the middle of a soap opera in your own home?

Buckle up and get ready to ride the emotional rollercoaster! Right-brained kiddos wear their emotions on their sleeves. They experience emotion more intensely, and the expression of said emotion follows suit.

These kids are the loudest of the bunch in most crowds and will not discriminate in how or when their big feelings come out (church, libraries, funerals, etc).

If you’re a parent who’s uncomfortable with their emotions, watch out because your kid can read you like the latest issue of Highlights. With a highly emotional soul often comes a highly intuitive person.

Your kid knows exactly when you’re feeling overwhelmed or frustrated, serving to introduce anxiety into the already precarious equation and further exacerbating your child’s strong emotions.

On my weak days, many of these qualities are frustrating and can lead to feelings of defeat and exhaustion. On strong days, I’m so ridiculously grateful to have this outside-the-box kid who teaches me (or forces me, if we’re being honest) to look at things in life, both small and large, in completely new ways.

And at the end of the day, I know deep down that these wisdoms are well worth the destruction of what’s formerly known as my intact parenting ego.