After a school day, my boys need some quiet time on their own. We live in rural Arizona in a spread out ranch style house, so space isn’t the problem. They’re just magnetically drawn to each other and are very likely to start fussing and fighting.

My solution? Transforming the bedroom closet into a tiny reading space. Bean bag, battery powered push lights, plastic milk crate, and some throw pillows. My eight-year-old or his 12-year-old brother can climb in to read or just be away from everyone else for a little while.

A book nook can be fancy or simple, but the most important elements are these: privacy and comfort. You want to be able to transport yourself to the places in your book and escape real life for a little while.

via Pinterest

I love the simplicity here, and the functionality. You could set up as many of these little tents as you need to for the kids on hand, inside or out. And each kid still feels the delicious sense of being in her own world.

via The New York Times

This may not be the most practical, but without a doubt, this design by Japanese furniture designer Sakura Adachi is my favorite reading spot I’ve seen. Even better? There are sizes for adults, children, and even pets. Imagine your public library shelves with built-in spots for reading. This book nook may lack some privacy, but it is so well integrated you might not even see your child after a while.

via Houzz

With a home renovation, just a few square feet were captured to make this reading space in a hallway or landing area. That’s the beauty of a book nook – small spaces are preferable for feeling secure and cozy.

via Pinterest

This igloo-like construction doesn’t cost a penny and could easily be made with children. If your family drinks a lot of milk, you might be able to gather the supplies yourself. Otherwise, it could involve a little community outreach. The dome structure provides the isolation a book nook needs, though the jugs do take up a little more space than other materials.

via Archello

I love these reading pods for their vertical design and how they don’t take up floor space. They are used in a school here, but could certainly be utilized in a home with some structural support. Book nooks create an opportunity to think about space in different ways, and they don’t have to be a permanent structure.

Another simple way to create a discrete space is with sheer curtains. A few pillows suddenly seem isolated, special, otherworldly, and way more fun than sitting on the couch to read.

via Houzz

This is my life dream book nook. Doors that close. A mini library, space for books. A little funky, a little cool. When I get paid for that up-and-coming bestselling series, this will be on the top of the list.

Till then, I’ll enjoy the perfect reading chair I finally found.